Migos: Culture II Review

Do you remember when the hip-hop trio Migos came to fame? The public had the hardest time deciphering the difference between each member. We later discovered the individuals as cousins Quavo (Real Name: Quavious Keyate Marshall, the oldest), Offset (Real Name: Kiari Kendrell Cephus, the middle), and nephew Takeoff (Real Name: Kirshnik Khari Ball, the youngest). The trio... Continue Reading →

Little Known Black History Fact: The Muse Brothers

Black America Web

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The tale of George and Willie Muse, albino brothers living in the rural South during the late 1800s, is stirring.

According to accounts, the brothers were kidnapped as boys, sold off to a local carnival sideshow and paraded around the country. The Muse brothers were a rarity: Black albinos would be a lucrative attraction for a carnival with a so-called “human oddities” segment. According to a report by The Roanoke Times, the brothers were tricked by a bounty hunter working for a sideshow promoter and taken away from their mother. The man told the brothers that their mother was dead.

In the circus, the dreadlocked brothers were first said to hail from “a colony of sheep-headed people.” The brothers learned to play guitar and mandolin, which became a feature of their act. Showman Al G. Barnes then promoted them as White Ecuadorian cannibals. The Muse…

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The Climate Change

*2015 IUPUI IDEAS SOLVING SOCIAL AND ECONOMIC CHALLENGES (ISSEC) Pitch When most people hear about a climate change they imagine the Earth facing extreme weather. However, I will be discussing a change of social experience within the education system. As we enter a new era, the race for academic success has never been more competitive.Throughout the... Continue Reading →

Happy Halloween from The Geek Anthropologist!

Happy Halloween!

The Geek Anthropologist

I think it’s safe to say that anthropologists don’t scare easily. During fieldwork, anthropologists may be called upon to communicate with demons or spirits through a shaman or spiritual conduit; confront death and mourning rituals; interface with corpses or occult artifacts; or negotiate conditions of extreme poverty, violence or illness. Anthropology also requires a certain amount of existential and physical vulnerability from its practitioners throughout ethnographic research; anthropologists may be called upon to enter dangerous, uncomfortable, eerie and perhaps frightening scenarios for the sake of their fieldwork. Many anthropologists, questing after research in the subaltern, dispossessed or invisible aspects of societies or cultures, regularly deal in patterns of fright and death, spooks and the supernatural, and the impact of demons—whether spiritual or institution—on the daily lives of people in their ethnographic communities.

From Ossian Brown's collection of vintage Halloween pictures Haunted Air. Source: http://www.ln-cc.com/content/ebiz/latenightcatcafe/page/ossian-brown-interview/ha_12.jpg From Ossian Brown’s collection of vintage Halloween pictures Haunted Air. Source: http://www.ln-cc.com/content/ebiz/latenightcatcafe/page/ossian-brown-interview/ha_12.jpg

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